Thursday, January 17, 2013

QR Code Dewey Hunt


Last week to help the fourth and fifth graders understand the Dewey Decimal system a bit better, I created a PowerPoint and a QR code scavenger hunt.  You can get a copy of the PowerPoint I used by clicking here or on the picture above.



After I went over each of the Dewey sections, students broke into groups and followed clues to QR codes.



They used the QR code app i-nigma to scan the codes to see if they were correct and then they read their next clue.


You might remember from this post last year, that I taught the Dewey Body Buddy to 2nd grade last year to help them remember the different sections.  I reviewed that lesson with 3rd grade this year and also taught it to 2nd grade.  You can get a free copy of the PowerPoint I used by clicking here or on the picture above.


They each took home a Dewey Body Buddy study sheet that they completed during the lesson as well as a bookmark to help them remember the sections. If you'd like a copy of this lesson, you can click here or on the picture above.

How do you teach the Dewey Decimal System or have you ditched Dewey altogether?


12 comments:

  1. I still teach Dewey. My kids love to listen and learn the Dewey rap. It is one of their favorite things all year! Thank you so much for the lessons!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm glad to know that Dewey is not dead everywhere. =) I'd love to have the words to the Dewey rap if you have them. I haven't seen that one yet. Hope you find the lessons helpful!

      Delete
  2. Hi! Do you have a copy of the clues you gave the kids for the QR code hunt? I'd like to use it with my students.
    Thanks for a great idea!
    Julie

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't have a list of the questions typed up. I just kind of made them up as I was making the scavenger hunt, but it was questions like "You are going to babysit your next door neighbor's kids and you want to find some fun crafts they would enjoy. What non-fiction section is likely to have craft books with ideas you could use?" or "You have been assigned a project to do on the rain forest. What non-fiction section would most likely have books about the rain forest that you could use to help you with your project?" Hope that helps! =)

      Delete
  3. I am interested in how you set up the clues for the Dewey QR Code hunt. I have been trying to think how I would organize it and I am coming up blank. Do you have them going from section to section? Do you have a clue and an answer in each Dewey section?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I divided the classes up into groups and each group got a set of 5 different clues which led them to different Dewey sections. The first clue was given to them at the table. The rest of the clues were in the pockets behind the QR codes in the different Dewey sections. They had to scan the QR code first to see if they were in the correct section before picking up the clue in the pocket to move on to the next section. The questions were things like "You found a tree in your grandmother's backyard and you'd like to know more about it. What non-fiction section would have books that might help you learn more about the tree?"

      Delete
  4. Just to make sure I am doing this right.... when they scan the QR code the "answer" comes up..what did you put for the answer? the Dewey number, the Dewey category? Thanks!

    I love this idea!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Their clues had a shapes on them and when they scanned the QR code, if they saw the shape that was listed on a clue, they knew they were in the correct spot. If they didn't get that shape, they had to go to a different spot. I color coded the shapes and QR codes. 5 different shapes in 5 different colors so that teams wouldn't get mixed up.

      Delete
  5. Thanks for your response! What program did you use to create your QR codes? I found one, but I can't get the shape to copy in..?

    Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I use qrstuff.com to create the QR codes, but first I have to upload the shape pictures to http://postimg.org and add the link that I get from http://postimg.org to qrstuff.com to get the qr code.
      It's a long process, but the final product is worth it.

      Delete
  6. I love this lesson and am going to implement it in my own library! One thing though, when I used postimg.org, when I would scan the QR code, the image I had posted would come up, but so would a bunch of images and links to celebrity gossip, etc. I played around and found that using imgur would bring up my image only, so that might be better just for Internet safety/appropriateness. Jo, I'm still unclear about how you gave them their remaining clues. Did you just tape them to the back of the QR code and they would have to remember it? Did you have several of each clue made so they could grab it and take it with them (and you wouldn't have to put them all back for the next class)? Are there any pictures of what it looked like?

    Also, here's the Dewey rap since it doesn't look like Sarah responded...my kids love it too :)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NHiUQb5xg7A

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Erin,
      I am not getting any links to inappropriate items when I can the codes with the i-Nigma app. It may depend on the QR scanner you are using. Also, when I uploaded my images to postimg.org, I made sure to click the box next to family friendly. Don't know if that might be the difference or not. I left the clue in the envelope that the QR code is on. The clue would say "Looking for this shape?" And then it would have a picture of the shape on the clue they were just reading. The answer continues "If so, you've found it! Give the iPad to the person who had this shape on their stick." (Students drew sticks with different colored shapes on them to break up into groups.) And then they pull the clue from the envelope and read the next clue. The next clue also has a colored shape on it. I only had one clue per envelope, but I labeled the back of each clue with the Dewey number so I could put it back quickly for the next class. Each group of QR codes was a different color so each group knew which QR codes they could scan. Only QR codes in their group's color would give them the correct answer. Here's a link to one answer picture that comes up when the QR code is scanned: red triangle answer It was a very involved planning/creating process trying to figure out how everything would work, but I've done this lesson for two years now, so it was worth all the work. Hope I've answered your question. =)

      Delete